Cape Mongo

Cape Mongo

Cape Mongo

15 min 32 sec
Single Channel Video
South Africa, 2015

Cape Mongo is a project that combines the film, performance art in public spaces, and sculpture. Mongo itself is a slang word which means ‘recycled object.’ This work interprets the past by the objects of cultural consumerism in the city of Cape Town, South Africa. Through performance of the sculpture character Mongo, the artist explores and records specific locations in Cape Town—including the mass events—in order to train the memory of consumerism that has infiltrated into the urban life. search

The exploration performed by Mongo—a sculpture figure made from mass-products recycled materials—in a span of nearly two years, then constructed as the image to represent the historical tension of endemic inequality and social isolation that characterize the city today. The film also harmonize with recycling attitude, when the memory of the documented consumerism culture was screened along with clusters of  building footages that reflects the continuity of growing cultural civilization in the production-consumption patterns on the object, whether physical or not.

Francois Knoetze
Francois Knoetze is a Cape Town based artist working between visual and performing arts. Knoetze holds a BFA from Rhodes University in Grahamstown and an MFA from the Michaelis School of Fine Art in Cape Town (both with distinction). Knoetze’s work investigates the relationship between the aesthetics of waste and the glossy facade of consumerism. Through public performance, sculpture and film, his practice explores the nuanced lives of discarded objects and the powerful scope that the indeterminacy of trash allows for reorganisation and redefinition. He has participated at a number of group shows, some including the 2014 Cape Town Art Fair, The Big Hole (Art Week Cape Town 2014), the National Arts Festival Main Program (‘Analogue Eye’ in 2014 and ‘Discharge’ in 2012), the Absa L’Atelier exhibition (2011), and the Sasol New Signatures exhibition (2011 & 2013).