Long Live

Long Live

Long Live

5 min 20 sec
Single channel video
Taiwan, 2011-2012

Yao Jui-chung crafted two connecting art pieces. The first series, Long Live, was made in 2011-2012 period; while the second series, Long Long Live, was finished in 2013. Both artworks possess similar structures as it shows two different historical situations.

In Long Live, Yao presents a general repeatedly screaming ‘Wansui!’ (Alive!) in a deprecated Chieh-shou theatre (meaning long live ‘Chiang Kai-shek!’) next to the Chungshan building in Yangmingshan. In the end, the camera took us to an abandoned cinema where it is projected on screen to repeat the immortal echo of history.

Meanwhile in Long Long Live, Yao connected with the Taiyuan Clash, a prisoners’ revolt resulting in a prison take over on February 8, 1970. The violent clash had involved 150 people, including six politicians, 50 prison guards and Taiwanese youth held captive. The consequence was deadly, as five inmates were executed on April 27, 1970. The incident had also ignited the riot against the Kuomintang regime and the call for Taiwan’s independence. While Yao presented a cinema building on his Long Live piece, in Long Long Live, he ended the feature with a television at a prison’s dining room.

Yao Jui-Chung

An artist, critics, curator and art lecturer at NTNU (National Taiwan Normal University). He graduated from Taipei National University of the Arts. Representing Taiwan in Venice Biennale 1997. In 2005 he participated in International Triennale of Contemporary Art Yokohama ad 6th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (2009). Yao Jui-Chung frequently use photography, installation, and paintings, and in 2003 he was the curator for King-Kon Never Dies – The Contemporary Performance & Video art in Taiwan (2003). His essays were widely published in several journals. He also published books in contemporary visual art, such Installation Art in Taiwan since 1991-2001 (2002) and Performance Art in Taiwan 1978-2004 (2005).